20:00, Mon 16 Apr
Lovely :D
Fat Buddha - 'Rab C Nesbitt. He's a contrary fecker, but invariably right. He has his finger on the motherfecking pulse.'
08:36, Tue 17 Apr
:D
Rags on the new Forum:
"Who on earth still has signatures showing ? ... they're the same every single time ... you've read 'em once then just hide them forever"
10:00, Tue 17 Apr
Horse should have pissed it but jockey wouldn’t let it.

Oh well, I lost a £5 free bet that I would have just lost on something else anyway.

Feel for those who lost chunks of real cash on that fix.
10:23, Tue 17 Apr
Jockey wouldn’t let it :D
Fat Buddha - 'Rab C Nesbitt. He's a contrary fecker, but invariably right. He has his finger on the motherfecking pulse.'
10:32, Tue 17 Apr
Did you watch the race?
10:34, Tue 17 Apr
What happened?
10:36, Tue 17 Apr
CheswickBlue
Did you watch the race?
Yes. And tens of thousand of others. Are you saying seriously the jockey got his own horse beat?
Fat Buddha - 'Rab C Nesbitt. He's a contrary fecker, but invariably right. He has his finger on the motherfecking pulse.'
10:39, Tue 17 Apr
Rab C Nesbitt
CheswickBlue
Did you watch the race?
Yes. And tens of thousand of others. Are you saying seriously the jockey got his own horse beat?

I have to agree did look a little fixed given the horse seemed to be getting boxed in by the other 3 horses several times and the jockey didn't seem to push him until it was too late.
10:42, Tue 17 Apr
The jockey hardly touched the horse. Coming round the final bend he should have gone on to piss it but didn’t.

I’m by no means a horse racing guru, so I’m happy to bow to superior knowledge but I know enough to get by, and that whole race looked fishy.
10:50, Tue 17 Apr
CheswickBlue
that whole race looked fishy.

So that's different to any other horse race how?

There was a documentary on the BBC about the shenanigans in horse racing about 20 years ago. They interviewed a recently retired jockey who said "I've never started a race where I hadn't been told what position I was expected to finish in." It was normally a place well down the order to bump up subsequent odds.

Its been going on as long as horse racing has existed. Do a few races where the horse appears to be making a reasonable effort but finishes outside the places to bump up the odds for subsequent races then lump on and romp home at exaggerated odds. Its possibly more difficult to do it these days because computerisation means they can spot unusual betting patterns in an instant.
11:02, Tue 17 Apr
TBH, to get things in perspective slightly. This was a horse that had one previous race (A year ago) which it fell in, and burst blood vessels. It was a 50/1 shot in the opening of the betting, so if you base it on that alone it was a VERY good run!

I don't think the jockey could have done much more, possibly ground went against the horse, due to lack of any form to go by, no one knows what is the preferred ground for it.

However........

Notably there was a NR in the race which took the number of runners left to 4, meaning no Each Way terms for the bookies to pay out on which to me left a bit of a sour taste in truth. The stable for which the runner was from is relatively small and if something came out in the future (It wont!), It wouldn't totally surprise you if a few of those betting firms offered a fair sum of money for the horse to get beat 8-)

This is obviously all speculation, and in all honesty I don't know what to think. All I know is we had a good run for our money, and it added a bit of excitement to a normally dull Monday evening for me.
Steve Cotterill 2005 'I don't want to give Robbie Blake any praise, but he was superb.'

@1981marc
11:16, Tue 17 Apr
lowercaser
CheswickBlue
that whole race looked fishy.

So that's different to any other horse race how?

There was a documentary on the BBC about the shenanigans in horse racing about 20 years ago. They interviewed a recently retired jockey who said "I've never started a race where I hadn't been told what position I was expected to finish in." It was normally a place well down the order to bump up subsequent odds.

Its been going on as long as horse racing has existed. Do a few races where the horse appears to be making a reasonable effort but finishes outside the places to bump up the odds for subsequent races then lump on and romp home at exaggerated odds. Its possibly more difficult to do it these days because computerisation means they can spot unusual betting patterns in an instant.
Unless it's a high class race where the prize money is high and horse are running off level weights, 90% of the races are handicaps. Yo win these you have yo have a horse running in the grade that it can win in (the better the grade they go slightly quicker pace), be carrying a weight which gives it a great chance,run it on the correct going, correct course. To get a horse in this position you have to spend time doing the opposite to this. The code/instructions to the kick would be "don't give the horse a hard time" Getting a horse to win a race is much harder than meets the eye as they are not robots and are pack animals and sometimes just don't want to be in front.
An example of how they can make fools of you was my own horse I had last year Archie Stevens, ran for me about 6 times we tried landing a touch at Brighton got beat a head. I gave the horse back to the trainer it won next time ou at Southwell at 22/1, no I didn't back it as thought track would not suit. It's now run only there 13 times winning 1 and placing 8 times. Thats racing for you.
11:29, Tue 17 Apr
(tu)
Steve Cotterill 2005 'I don't want to give Robbie Blake any praise, but he was superb.'

@1981marc