11:55, Wed 13 Jun
Following on from the millenials thread, what's peoples history and current ability of using them?

I got a Vic20 in Christmas 1982. The school I went to had a computer room with a few Acorns and Apples, so I started off very early using them. By 16 I was online and getting in to Schweppes ordering system and sending crates of soft drinks out to unsuspecting pubs. I could do some basic programming, understood hardware and able to do probing of security, which was very basic. I did a temp job at Centrica ?(part of British Gas) and got into a couple of their servers by lunchtime without being noticed. I could have changed the price of gas by the end of the day :D

I never really took it much further than that, which was stupid given how much money decent IT geeks started to earn in the mid to late 90s.

Up to Windows 2000/XP I was pretty decent at reviewing and changing elements of software and until the mid 00s was still able to strip down and rebuild or make my own computer.

Now, like women, I no longer understands them but accept they're a massive part of my life and I can't live without them.
Luckily, the amount of heroin I use is harmless. I inject about once a month on a purely recreational basis. Fine. But what about other people less stable, less educated, less middle-class than me? Builders or blacks for example. If you're one of those, my advice to you is leave well alone. Good luck.
There were Acorn Electrons, Spectrums and Amigas in the house but they were for playing games on, the keys were mostly redundant
12:14, Wed 13 Jun
I had a spectrum 48 in 1982.
Amstrad CPC464 next.
Spectrum 128+2 (the +3 had a disk drive) when I was at school. I used it to play games (elite!) and program a little BASIC.

Studied B-Tec National in Computing, got a 286 PC with DOS 6 and Windows 3.1. It had 640k RAM and a 1MB HD. it had a few games on it, mainly point and click adventure games like Simon the Sorceror and Day of the Tentacle.

Bought a new motherboard, memory and HD (20MB) and a 386 processor. Used to look longingly at the £1500 jet black 486 with 14" monitor in Currys window.

I wrote programs in Borland Turbo 'C' for my 386, and used it for playing DOOM, Quake, F-22 Retaliator and drawing fractals (18 hours for a good Mandlebrot).

Got a second hand Pentium 486 for £50 and upgraded it to Windows 'Me' (Millenium), a cracked version my mate got. I loved Windows 'Me'. Got on the internet with that through a 56k modem, courtesy of Freeserve.

Did an online course on C# and JAVA and got a job as a software tester. Built a PC myself with Windows XP, decent graphics card, flat screen monitor etc, got Virgin Fibre broadband and never looked back from that.

Moved on to work in Software Development for the last 6 years, writing ePOS systems for Self Checkouts, did a little freelance work that enabled me to buy a new Windows 7 PC, and recently bought a Windows 10 PC that has 2Tb of storage. That's the equivalent of 2 million hard drives the same size as my first hard drive.

no, I won't fix your computer :D
Rags on the new Forum:
"Who on earth still has signatures showing ? ... they're the same every single time ... you've read 'em once then just hide them forever"
The Right Reverand Charcy Blue Blue
There were Acorn Electrons, Spectrums and Amigas in the house but they were for playing games on, the keys were mostly redundant

Had a commodore 64 in 1989, which was used for games and games only.

There was also a 'Dragon' PC in the house around that time which I think was stolen from somewhere. Nobody had a clue what to do with it. My last memory of it was on a car boot stall in Llandudno in 1993.
12:17, Wed 13 Jun
The first technology I was exposed to was that "pong" game you used to play on your telly - probably mid seventies?.

That seemed so advanced at the time that I couldn't believe life could get any more exciting.

Then I went to France in about 1981 and there was a café with a Space Invaders machine. My mind was now officially blown.

By about 1983 my school had one computer, for the whole school. I did however have the top score on Donkey Kong in the local chippy - 208000...that bad-boy-score has probably still never been beaten.

My mate had a Spectrum at home which we used to play Jet Set Willy and Manic Miner until the early hours of the morning.

As I said on the other thread I was advised to go into computers when I was about 14/15 but it sounded shit. I do sometimes wish I'd listened.

My first proper training was in the nineties when I worked for a company that sent me on actual training courses to learn the Microsoft Office programmes.

I have never been interested in programming and stuff.
12:20, Wed 13 Jun
First computer was a second hand one of these:

Linked Image
Old MacDonald had a farm. EU, EU... Oh.
JCL
12:21, Wed 13 Jun
First computer in the house was an Acorn Electron. Seem to recall my old man trying to get me and my sister to learn some programming, but it was all pretty rubbish. Load of lines to make a flash or some boxes move about. Didn’t really grab my attention.

High school we had a computer room but they were all rubbish and I don’t really remember anything we did in there. Do recall my Dad being involved in getting them a bunch on newer machines, he was involved with IT in Midland Bank/HSBC.

Had an Amstrad at home, had a built in floppy disk drive, which was the nuts after the previous tape deck. But that was soon old news after the word of the Amiga sweep round school with its awesome graphics and slick games. Had one of those, even fitted the additional 1MB pack underneath. Games were good, was also the first time a porn disk came into my possession.

To this day I still sometime sing to myself ‘haaayy, we want some puuuussssay’. Also had Erika Eleniak naked on one, which was awesome.

Went to uni, not many people had one, I did, was big and rubbish and spend a great many nights wanting to throw t out the window. Most people had to go the computer lab to use one.

I recon now I’m pretty OK with them. Never got into programming, although did do it for a job for while, but I can navigate around them, use most programs pretty well and aren’t scared to change stuff.

What is odd is my old man, yes him again, got to a pretty senior position within HSBC’s IT area, was EMEA Director at one point, but he still can’t Cut and Paste or get the whole Windows, folder and files thing.
"Don’t hang about here, its decidedly unhealthy"
12:21, Wed 13 Jun
When I did my options in 1990, they made me do German instead of Computer Studies because they said it would be 'more useful' :D
Rags on the new Forum:
"Who on earth still has signatures showing ? ... they're the same every single time ... you've read 'em once then just hide them forever"
12:30, Wed 13 Jun
Sounds like my evolution.

We had the tennis game at home too - Binatone I think. Here's someone's copy of it so the youth can see what passed for hi-tech gaming in the 1970s. If you moved the bat last second you could make the ball go at really acute angles.



Spent way too long on the Space Invaders machine in the chippy by The Happy Trooper and held the high score for a while. Used to count 11 shots and then wait for the mother ship to appear. This got you maximum points for hitting it (300 if I remember correctly).

At school computer studies was just starting when picking O'level options. It seemed to be the really nerdy types that did it so most gave it a big swerve. They seemed to spend all their time programming a game - I think it was called Star Trek. I was persuaded to do French instead and the teacher left that summer and we had a real prick of a French bloke teaching us thereafter so I lost all interest in it.

It was really mid-80's onwards that I started to work more with computers - first on terminals accessing a mainframe and then networked PCs. I can remember it being a big deal when the insurance company I worked for (a big regional office at the time) got its first fax machine in 1985...and that was shared for the whole 6-floor building.

No idea on programming at all but can maintain my PCs, upgrade them and deal with most network issues.
JCL
12:32, Wed 13 Jun
I've got one of those Binatone consoles in my loft.

Might have to get it out next tie the lads bring their PS4s over.
"Don’t hang about here, its decidedly unhealthy"
12:54, Wed 13 Jun
I'm a luddite. Today, the card reader went down in the canteen, but I could just walk up, put my cash down and take my baguette.

We'll still be here once the edifice falls.
Thongs
Number8 is the worlds best forum poster. FACT. End of chat.
13:26, Wed 13 Jun
My favourite games from the early days of computers were where you had to type in commands to navigate your way through tunnels in which lurked hostile and often magical forces. always finished up a bit like this:

Go East
Can't Go East

Go North
Can't Go North

Go South
Can't Go South

Go West
You have been eaten by an invisible giant hamster. Start Again?
masqueraiding as a intelligent person
13:33, Wed 13 Jun
"I did a temp job at Centrica ?(part of British Gas) and got into a couple of their servers by lunchtime without being noticed"

You'd be on a fortune today - serious dough in I.T. Security.
13:45, Wed 13 Jun
Microsoft certified IT pro from a few exams.
Some CompTia A+ exams.
Apprenticeship for IT and Telecoms

Real world experience now... Servers, Hardware, exchange, Virtualisation, GPO's, and some other packages etc etc. Typical management of a network.

I had some exposure to computers as a young kid, Atari, Windows 95, 98, some games consoles as you'd expect (master system 8-bit generation).
But it really started when i was about 11 when i got my first PC in 2000.
Compaq Presario with Windows Millenium Edition (it was a shit OS) and I just kept breaking and fixing it from there on.

Fdisking my hard drive at 13 just to see what would happen. Now it's my job - can't complain, I still like computers. Just would be easier if we didn't have users using them.
13:46, Wed 13 Jun
I worked on the Bass retail system in the late 80s early 90s. This was one of the first EPOS systems in the country, very basic DOS, most people had no idea about computers in those days.
I have no idea of modern programming so like most people I am an enthusiastic social user.
14:17, Wed 13 Jun
Spectrum ZX was mine. Used to have two games I played all the time. Tracksuit Manager and Football Director. Absolutely tremendous.

Then an Amiga 500 which to this day is the best piece of equipment I ever owned. Championship Manager on their, along with other faves Eye of The Beholder and Bards Tale.

Happy Days
Steve Cotterill 2005 'I don't want to give Robbie Blake any praise, but he was superb.'

@1981marc
14:26, Wed 13 Jun
Never touched a computer till about 10 years ago :D About the most technical thing i can do is post a gif on here.
14:28, Wed 13 Jun
Jet Set Willy was particularly frustrating in that way.

It took about 87 hours to play, then - oftentimes, a programming bug would see you stuck on the last but one level with no option but to restart.
14:32, Wed 13 Jun
notts_blue
When I did my options in 1990, they made me do German instead of Computer Studies because they said it would be 'more useful' :D

I wanted to do Computer Studies O'Level but they wouldn't let me. They said it's not a good subject for girls. Do French instead. What a waste of 2 years that was. Still hate computers. And French. Not too keen on teachers either.
14:40, Wed 13 Jun
B13blues
Never touched a computer till about 10 years ago :D About the most technical thing i can do is post a gif on here.

I still can’t even do that :D