18:48, Mon 3 Dec
There's one thing worse than a DRE. Telling your family you've got late-stage prostate cancer.

and for the younger audience: [www.myoddballs.com]
NotFitTo​LaceDeanPeersBoots
Yes, had one a while back also, they allowed you too watch it as it was travelling round your bowel, bit like watching Dyno Rod checking out your drains on a screen above ground. Its the pressure of it going up and when they have to take a left or right turn that makes it uncomfortable for me.

Bowel scope ? Yeah i've had that. Four women did it and i had to wear paper shorts with a back flap :). The next one is worse,it goes all around your body. They recommend being put out for that one.You get offered all sorts when you get to 50. Accept everything they offer.
19:05, Mon 3 Dec
John_Smullen
I had that camera, bloody hell what an unusual feeling.
Yes i had one its called Flexible Endoscopy. Its not very nice and the further they have to go in the more uncomfortable it is. I had Three further Endoscopy at 3 monthly intervals after the Cancer was surgically removed.
19:23, Mon 3 Dec
Thanks what a good thread I as some people know on here have bowel cancer but it can be cured I have had more fingers up my arse then I can remember or like but it's not that bad ct scans MRIs you can put your own tune in your head for that back in the 80is I could have had a hit song lol
As I say to anyone if in doubt got it checked out don't leave it
As I said creacking post mate
19:39, Mon 3 Dec
Great posts


11.00am 8th August 2014 Heartlands. I received the news I really wasn't expecting. Had all the tests you so eloquently discribe Gramsci. Thankfully due to a low score I had the option to observe rather than start any form of treatment. Four years on I am still having MIR scans and Biopsies, the last ones two months ago which came back clear, and I will continue to have them for as long as the Consultant advises me to.

Mate I wish you all the best and thank you for the posts, let us know how you are getting on.

Joe
19:56, Mon 3 Dec
had the finger up the bum after I had a spot of blood after peeing, it didn't half sting (the finger that is!)


also had the camera in the bladder, that was really uncomfortable but interesting to see the inside of my bladder and knob!!


they couldn't find anything wrong but the two weeks leading up to the tests were awful, you always assume the worst when you are ill, especially if you google the symptoms.


my heart goes out to anyone going through that.
Keeping Right On since 1981
20:08, Mon 3 Dec
Yes, Jo, they call this the 'Active Surveillance' approach which means that if you do not have cancer but a PSA score that is of concern OR you have a small, slow growing cancer you can choose to monitor it with PSAs and MRI's. That's no treatment but ongoing tests over the years. Hopefully, if my cancer is removed, with surgery next week, I can go onto that kind of regime for the future.

And one of the previous posts pointed to problems with PSAs and ways companies make monies and raise anxieties. Its important to remember that the finger up the bum, the PSA and MRI's do not give you a diagnosis of cancer and are only tests providing some information.

The finger up the bum examination and the PSA is cheap to do so you can do this easily on the NHS.
[www.prostatecanceruk.org] is a really useful link.

You can access information, speak to an advisor with expert information or email them. It’s a really good service, I think.
Yes, I reckon Philly must be right. The worst thing for me, about it all, was telling my grown up son and daughter I had cancer. It was very hard and, at the moment, I am told I can be treated and cured, hopefully.

Late stage cancer is a much greater burden to carry, I think. All the best Philly.
[www.prostatecanceruk.org] is a really useful link.

You can access information, speak to an advisor with expert information or email them. It’s a really good service, I think.
POSITIVE OR REALISTIC THINKING.

When I went to the QE for the results of the biopsies, I was appointed in the Cancer Centre. Oh, I thought, I'm in this place, now. It was weird because 36 years ago I began training as a nurse in this very hospital. It was strange. I did not feel positive.

On an electronic screen, there were different messages including 'Positive Thinking. Positive Vibes. Positive Lives'. I did not feel positive, especially when I saw an older man, walking down the corridor with a woman's arm around him and a nurse holding his hand. He had just been told. I knew. And then I followed him into the same office to be told a similar story I guess.

Now, the problem with 'positive thinking' is that its what estate agents, PR people and marketeers do. They are trying to flog you something you may not want or need. And let's face it, cancer is shit, isn't it? So a better bet is realistic thinking.

Realistic thinking goes something like this, when a young footballer is in front of a microphone: 'We will work hard in training and prepare for next week'. 'But, you are doing so well, Che, surely you fancy promotion this season?'. 'No, we can't think that far ahead. It's one game at a time'.

This is realistic thinking. Dealing with tests, treatments, problems, issue as they come along but also living your life. Living your life as best as you can is what this is about. Realistic thinking also involves avoiding catastrophic thinking. Cancer is not the bubonic plague and can be lived with. Cancer, unlike a major stroke for example, provides time. Sometimes months, or years or decades. Time to do things and see people. Realistic thinking.
[www.prostatecanceruk.org] is a really useful link.

You can access information, speak to an advisor with expert information or email them. It’s a really good service, I think.
Alternatively, here is a highly relevant public information film from Billy Connolly.


[www.prostatecanceruk.org] is a really useful link.

You can access information, speak to an advisor with expert information or email them. It’s a really good service, I think.
20:45, Mon 3 Dec
Your point about it feeling weird first time in the cancer hospital. I just kept singing the Man City “We’re not really here” from when they were playing in the 3rd tier. Cos that’s how it felt
22:20, Mon 3 Dec
We'll done posting this ,I moved down south last year as part of signing on at a new doctors I had a series of blood tests with showed I had a PSA level of 5.9 whilst not mega high I was referred to a urologist, I didn't have any symptoms other than it took a bit longer to pass urine ,no getting up at night to pee , after an mri it was decided to do a rectal biopsy ,in my experience the first 8 samples were bearable the last 4 made me yelp a bit, I guess it varies depending on your pain threshold. Fortunately the two growths inside the prostate were benign,and I am having my psa levels monitored every six months now , my advice to anyone, have tests but be aware of side effects of even the biopsy, the side effects of prostate surgery can also be pretty unpleasant, but still better than being dead because you ignored any symptoms.
22:33, Mon 3 Dec
Yep, this really emphasises the issue of LIVING WITH UNCERTAINTY, I think.

There is uncertainty about the tests, treatments, side effects, complications and everything else. Medicine is not a science but an applied science which involves experience and expertise which can sometimes be wrong. Your body is not a machine that can fixed using the right algorithm so there is always some uncertainty. That uncertainty can cause anxiety, I guess. So, it's realistic thinking, working hard in training and one game at a time.

Blues 3 Bristol 1.
[www.prostatecanceruk.org] is a really useful link.

You can access information, speak to an advisor with expert information or email them. It’s a really good service, I think.
22:51, Mon 3 Dec
The wait for the biopsy results took a couple of weeks ,it felt like a month ,even though you are told to look on the positive side it's a difficult time ,I went on message boards and spoke to other prostate problem sufferers ,I found that a positive experience that helped .
23:07, Mon 3 Dec
Antonio Gramsci
Alternatively, here is a highly relevant public information film from Billy Connolly.




Brilliant,if you know you know !!
08:44, Wed 5 Dec
FIGHTING CANCER.

Can you fight cancer? So, as some say, 'he's a fighter' or 'she's a fighter'.

No, you can't. Normal microscopic cells have a capsule around them that is strong but cancer cells are not well encapsulated so they grow into other tissue or move within the body. You just can't fight those processes. It can be cured or treated but not fought.

And how does if feel to be told you are a fighter when, in fact, your body cannot be fought?
[www.prostatecanceruk.org] is a really useful link.

You can access information, speak to an advisor with expert information or email them. It’s a really good service, I think.
Antonio Gramsci
Yes, I reckon Philly must be right. The worst thing for me, about it all, was telling my grown up son and daughter I had cancer. It was very hard and, at the moment, I am told I can be treated and cured, hopefully.

Late stage cancer is a much greater burden to carry, I think. All the best Philly.
To be clear. I don't have late stage PC, at least I hope I don't. My annual physical was in October and everything seems to still be in decent shape.
Great. Good luck to you.
[www.prostatecanceruk.org] is a really useful link.

You can access information, speak to an advisor with expert information or email them. It’s a really good service, I think.
22:33, Wed 5 Dec
Good luck and well played for sharing all the info.
I survived it 9 years ago via a laperascopic prostatectomy, and have just had the annual all clear again for another year.
I’d have been long gone if I hadn’t pushed to get checked out, I’d had no symptoms but had read that it was hereditary just before it killed my dad.
Kro
07:16, Thu 6 Dec
Yep, that's really important. I had no symptoms of prostate cancer, too. I was lucky in a way as I developed an infection called prostatitis which is not an indicator of cancer but did lead to the tests and the eventual diagnosis. That's why being cautious, as you said, is important. It's a hassle to have these tests but comparatively minor hassle (apart from the biopsies).
[www.prostatecanceruk.org] is a really useful link.

You can access information, speak to an advisor with expert information or email them. It’s a really good service, I think.