14:52, Wed 9 Oct
Lord Rockingham
Devon does have a county team - it's just that it's a 'minor county'...a weird hangover from ancient days that needs sorting.

I realise that, but that wasn't my point.

Lord Rockingham
Is the success of 'the 100' going to be measured by sponsorship and TV viewing figures rather than bums on seats?

If you're only going to have max 8 teams and they're going to be city based, large areas (S West, E Anglia, Cumbria...) are going to miss out

THAT is my point! lol
16:38, Wed 9 Oct
kevb8ll
Lord Rockingham
Devon does have a county team - it's just that it's a 'minor county'...a weird hangover from ancient days that needs sorting.

I realise that, but that wasn't my point.

Lord Rockingham
Is the success of 'the 100' going to be measured by sponsorship and TV viewing figures rather than bums on seats?

If you're only going to have max 8 teams and they're going to be city based, large areas (S West, E Anglia, Cumbria...) are going to miss out

THAT is my point! lol

Difficult to imagine any real numbers travelling over to Cardiff even from Bristol or Gloucester really isn't it? 'Welsh Fire' doesn't give it the sense of being anything other than a Welsh thing.

Anywhere between Cardiff, Brum, London and East Anglia could be potentially 100s of miles away from a team (which to be fair is already the case in, say, Norwich). Northants can feel hard done by though, and it will be interesting to see how the wider regions get behind even the places they are close to - e.g. are Leics and Derbyshire fans going to see Trent Rockets in Nottingham?
The Reverend
Nope it's not. How can it be? It takes place for 4 days of a 7 day week during the working hours of most peoples day. I find it hard to understand how it was ever particularly well supported. People follow it but unless you're rich or retired you can't really go all that often.

I'm not sure it really ever was if we're talking attendance - kind of a gentlemanly hobby. If anything, test cricket is better supported now than it used to be. Good article here: [www.theguardian.com]

Test match fans tend to be thanatophobic. They are absolutely obsessed with morbid thoughts about the sport’s impending death ... Odd thing is, it’s not true, or even close to it. Test match crowds are bigger now than they have been at any point since the 1950s, when the authorities would push in the boundary ropes to allow people to sit on the grass verges. In Simon Wilde’s excellent new biography of the England cricket team, there is a table of Test match attendances in England over the past 40 years. It shows the average gate at an England Test was 52,851 in the 1980s, 63,853 in the 1990s, 72,568 in the 2000s, and 77,418 in the 2010s. So, in that time, the average gate at an English Test match has risen by 46%.

Different in the County Championship, but I suspect that's never been that well supported either. When I was working on planning the big new stand 10-12 years ago, there was a day when only 6 (six) people paid to enter for, I think, a third day of a championship game. It never seems to be a game played for spectators, a few hardy members aside.
17:09, Wed 9 Oct
It’s grown in England but very few people watch it elsewhere in the world, other than the odd key series.

All those who play know the long form is the true test of the game, but as people have said most crowds for county games are sparse. The thing is though test cricket is meaningless unless the long form is played at county (or state or whatever) level.

P.s crowds were bigger at county level for a short time after the war. Not sure how given how long people worked (though maybe it was exaggerated how much the type of person that watched county cricket actually worked).
DES
17:13, Wed 9 Oct
Yes Newblue and there is the conundrum, how to get players in test match mindset if they don't play CC
As the great man (GB) said flash fifties win ltd overs games but for tests its big hundreds!

KRO