16:30, Wed 16 Sep
Okay .. concrete posts... framed vertical feather edge boards ... 6ft x 6ft

... drop the panels into the slots in the posts

... should the panel be really tight ? ... or should it be allowed some room to shake/move ?

Some people say there should be room for them to move ...

... i say "in the wind, when they rattle, that shortens their life span because they're shaking themselves apart - so stick a wedge in, or a batten and make them tight"

I honestly don't know which is right and wanted input
16:50, Wed 16 Sep
They should be tight imo. For the reasons you state.
Old wooden clothes pegs are usually decent wedges.
Or I use limestone chipping a I’ve got to stop the top of the panel rattling in the grooves of the post.
Btw are you using gravel boards now or putting a new fence up?
Jude Bellingham - "Once a blue, always a blue" “This is my Club, I love the Club to bits. I’d die for this Club”
16:55, Wed 16 Sep
They should be tight imo. For the reasons you state.
Old wooden clothes pegs are usually decent wedges.
Or I use limestone chipping a I’ve got to stop the top of the panel rattling in the grooves of the post.
Btw are you using gravel boards now or putting a new fence up?


Gravel boards (2 x height) and concrete posts are already installed ... just dropping new panels in, s'all - in fact we've dropped the panels in and was simply wondering whether or not to

1 .. put wedges in a couple to tighten the fit
2 .. sand a couple of mm off the tight ones to make them fit looser
16:58, Wed 16 Sep
If you are doing it yourself cut a piece of timber to use as a jig, I did this job myself during lockdown, I used an old decking board cut at 5ft. Just a tip, you don't have too much time if using postcrete, it set's very quickly. It was a job I wasn't looking forward to, but we took our time and it's a decent job.

Edit - a lot easier job if you have the existing posts!
17:02, Wed 16 Sep
Yeah always better to wedge mate.
If you were putting new posts in, I was going to say put your first post in and square it up(obviously then put your gravel board in the slot , to get where to dig your next hole, and get the 2nd concrete post as tight to the board as possible. Then the panel will have as less ‘rattle’ as is possible. Some do seem to leave a bit of wriggle room. I think that’s daft.

My mate(experienced fence putter upper ) taught me that on my 29 panel fence at home (still got the same panels 19 years later, but are ready to be replaced with plastic composite panels in the next few years) and 3 other fence jobs latterly.
Others with more experience may disagree. But I won’t understand why
Jude Bellingham - "Once a blue, always a blue" “This is my Club, I love the Club to bits. I’d die for this Club”
17:04, Wed 16 Sep
Rags
They should be tight imo. For the reasons you state.
Old wooden clothes pegs are usually decent wedges.
Or I use limestone chipping a I’ve got to stop the top of the panel rattling in the grooves of the post.
Btw are you using gravel boards now or putting a new fence up?


Gravel boards (2 x height) and concrete posts are already installed ... just dropping new panels in, s'all - in fact we've dropped the panels in and was simply wondering whether or not to

1 .. put wedges in a couple to tighten the fit
2 .. sand a couple of mm off the tight ones to make them fit looser
Again , always 1. They will come out once in, even if they’re tight.

And finally fair play for spending more on the vertical feather edge panels (closeboard panels).
Imo they’ll last twice as long as the cheaper overlap panels.
To strengthen them further you can attach 2 batons underneath and above the central supporting baton to further strengthen them and stop the panels pulling and twisting over time. Treat them every year if possible and you’ll get 20 years out of them.
The composite stuff is expensive but.... a long term maintenance free option and look ace in grey and that won’t fade as much as the brown and you can put a lacquer on to protect from uv damage
Jude Bellingham - "Once a blue, always a blue" “This is my Club, I love the Club to bits. I’d die for this Club”
17:12, Wed 16 Sep
I did fencing for 20yrs. The panels you’ve used should last a long long time if treated every couple of years especially as you’ve used gravel boards to keep em off The ground. I always liked to get em in nice and tight, nothing worse than sitting in your garden sipping a cocktail and having your fence rattling around you if it’s breezy. As long as you’ve put the concrete posts in right then it won’t be going anywhere even in high winds. Like Rab said any rattlers just use small wedges to tighten them up.
17:14, Wed 16 Sep
My mate taught me well then.
You’re a man of many talents Rodg
Jude Bellingham - "Once a blue, always a blue" “This is my Club, I love the Club to bits. I’d die for this Club”
17:20, Wed 16 Sep
Rags
They should be tight imo. For the reasons you state.
Old wooden clothes pegs are usually decent wedges.
Or I use limestone chipping a I’ve got to stop the top of the panel rattling in the grooves of the post.
Btw are you using gravel boards now or putting a new fence up?


Gravel boards (2 x height) and concrete posts are already installed ... just dropping new panels in, s'all - in fact we've dropped the panels in and was simply wondering whether or not to

1 .. put wedges in a couple to tighten the fit
2 .. sand a couple of mm off the tight ones to make them fit looser
Again , always 1. They will come out once in, even if they’re tight.

And finally fair play for spending more on the vertical feather edge panels (closeboard panels).
Imo they’ll last twice as long as the cheaper overlap panels.
To strengthen them further you can attach 2 batons underneath and above the central supporting baton to further strengthen them and stop the panels pulling and twisting over time. Treat them every year if possible and you’ll get 20 years out of them.
The composite stuff is expensive but.... a long term maintenance free option and look ace in grey and that won’t fade as much as the brown and you can put a lacquer on to protect from uv damage

"
Well you WILL be impressed because this is exactly how they are .. "To strengthen them further you can attach 2 batons underneath and above the central supporting baton to further strengthen them"

"Cuprinol duckback silver copse" on all 24 tomorrow (and probably Friday to be honest)
17:21, Wed 16 Sep
That he did mate. Cheers Rab, In my younger days I couldn’t make the male escort job pay so I jumped into the landscaping game.
17:22, Wed 16 Sep
I did fencing for 20yrs. The panels you’ve used should last a long long time if treated every couple of years especially as you’ve used gravel boards to keep em off The ground. I always liked to get em in nice and tight, nothing worse than sitting in your garden sipping a cocktail and having your fence rattling around you if it’s breezy. As long as you’ve put the concrete posts in right then it won’t be going anywhere even in high winds. Like Rab said any rattlers just use small wedges to tighten them up.

"The panels you’ve used should last a long long time if treated every couple of years especially as you’ve used gravel boards to keep em off The ground."

Cheers ... yes, on 2 x gravel boards ... panels framed top, bottom and both sides and three horizontal battens across each
17:24, Wed 16 Sep
Rags
Rags
They should be tight imo. For the reasons you state.
Old wooden clothes pegs are usually decent wedges.
Or I use limestone chipping a I’ve got to stop the top of the panel rattling in the grooves of the post.
Btw are you using gravel boards now or putting a new fence up?


Gravel boards (2 x height) and concrete posts are already installed ... just dropping new panels in, s'all - in fact we've dropped the panels in and was simply wondering whether or not to

1 .. put wedges in a couple to tighten the fit
2 .. sand a couple of mm off the tight ones to make them fit looser
Again , always 1. They will come out once in, even if they’re tight.

And finally fair play for spending more on the vertical feather edge panels (closeboard panels).
Imo they’ll last twice as long as the cheaper overlap panels.
To strengthen them further you can attach 2 batons underneath and above the central supporting baton to further strengthen them and stop the panels pulling and twisting over time. Treat them every year if possible and you’ll get 20 years out of them.
The composite stuff is expensive but.... a long term maintenance free option and look ace in grey and that won’t fade as much as the brown and you can put a lacquer on to protect from uv damage

"
Well you WILL be impressed because this is exactly how they are .. "To strengthen them further you can attach 2 batons underneath and above the central supporting baton to further strengthen them"

"Cuprinol duckback silver copse" on all 24 tomorrow (and probably Friday to be honest)
I’d be going into April 😁
👌
Jude Bellingham - "Once a blue, always a blue" “This is my Club, I love the Club to bits. I’d die for this Club”
17:24, Wed 16 Sep
If you are doing it yourself cut a piece of timber to use as a jig, I did this job myself during lockdown, I used an old decking board cut at 5ft. Just a tip, you don't have too much time if using postcrete, it set's very quickly. It was a job I wasn't looking forward to, but we took our time and it's a decent job.

Edit - a lot easier job if you have the existing posts!

Cheers ... oh i have plenty of timber to use as wedges etc ... 24 old fence panels to be exact
17:25, Wed 16 Sep
Roger the lodger
That he did mate. Cheers Rab, In my younger days I couldn’t make the male escort job pay so I jumped into the landscaping game.
Weird some of these women are pal.
I’d pay decent money for you now
Jude Bellingham - "Once a blue, always a blue" “This is my Club, I love the Club to bits. I’d die for this Club”
17:26, Wed 16 Sep
Hahaa cheers pal.