20:45, Mon 3 Dec
Your point about it feeling weird first time in the cancer hospital. I just kept singing the Man City “We’re not really here” from when they were playing in the 3rd tier. Cos that’s how it felt
22:20, Mon 3 Dec
We'll done posting this ,I moved down south last year as part of signing on at a new doctors I had a series of blood tests with showed I had a PSA level of 5.9 whilst not mega high I was referred to a urologist, I didn't have any symptoms other than it took a bit longer to pass urine ,no getting up at night to pee , after an mri it was decided to do a rectal biopsy ,in my experience the first 8 samples were bearable the last 4 made me yelp a bit, I guess it varies depending on your pain threshold. Fortunately the two growths inside the prostate were benign,and I am having my psa levels monitored every six months now , my advice to anyone, have tests but be aware of side effects of even the biopsy, the side effects of prostate surgery can also be pretty unpleasant, but still better than being dead because you ignored any symptoms.
22:33, Mon 3 Dec
Yep, this really emphasises the issue of LIVING WITH UNCERTAINTY, I think.

There is uncertainty about the tests, treatments, side effects, complications and everything else. Medicine is not a science but an applied science which involves experience and expertise which can sometimes be wrong. Your body is not a machine that can fixed using the right algorithm so there is always some uncertainty. That uncertainty can cause anxiety, I guess. So, it's realistic thinking, working hard in training and one game at a time.

Blues 3 Bristol 1.
[www.prostatecanceruk.org] is a really useful link.

You can access information, speak to an advisor with expert information or email them. It’s a really good service, I think.
22:51, Mon 3 Dec
The wait for the biopsy results took a couple of weeks ,it felt like a month ,even though you are told to look on the positive side it's a difficult time ,I went on message boards and spoke to other prostate problem sufferers ,I found that a positive experience that helped .
23:07, Mon 3 Dec
Antonio Gramsci
Alternatively, here is a highly relevant public information film from Billy Connolly.




Brilliant,if you know you know !!
08:44, Wed 5 Dec
FIGHTING CANCER.

Can you fight cancer? So, as some say, 'he's a fighter' or 'she's a fighter'.

No, you can't. Normal microscopic cells have a capsule around them that is strong but cancer cells are not well encapsulated so they grow into other tissue or move within the body. You just can't fight those processes. It can be cured or treated but not fought.

And how does if feel to be told you are a fighter when, in fact, your body cannot be fought?
[www.prostatecanceruk.org] is a really useful link.

You can access information, speak to an advisor with expert information or email them. It’s a really good service, I think.
Antonio Gramsci
Yes, I reckon Philly must be right. The worst thing for me, about it all, was telling my grown up son and daughter I had cancer. It was very hard and, at the moment, I am told I can be treated and cured, hopefully.

Late stage cancer is a much greater burden to carry, I think. All the best Philly.
To be clear. I don't have late stage PC, at least I hope I don't. My annual physical was in October and everything seems to still be in decent shape.
Great. Good luck to you.
[www.prostatecanceruk.org] is a really useful link.

You can access information, speak to an advisor with expert information or email them. It’s a really good service, I think.
22:33, Wed 5 Dec
Good luck and well played for sharing all the info.
I survived it 9 years ago via a laperascopic prostatectomy, and have just had the annual all clear again for another year.
I’d have been long gone if I hadn’t pushed to get checked out, I’d had no symptoms but had read that it was hereditary just before it killed my dad.
Kro
07:16, Thu 6 Dec
Yep, that's really important. I had no symptoms of prostate cancer, too. I was lucky in a way as I developed an infection called prostatitis which is not an indicator of cancer but did lead to the tests and the eventual diagnosis. That's why being cautious, as you said, is important. It's a hassle to have these tests but comparatively minor hassle (apart from the biopsies).
[www.prostatecanceruk.org] is a really useful link.

You can access information, speak to an advisor with expert information or email them. It’s a really good service, I think.
07:37, Thu 6 Dec
Antonio Gramsci
FIGHTING CANCER.

Can you fight cancer? So, as some say, 'he's a fighter' or 'she's a fighter'.

No, you can't. Normal microscopic cells have a capsule around them that is strong but cancer cells are not well encapsulated so they grow into other tissue or move within the body. You just can't fight those processes. It can be cured or treated but not fought.

And how does if feel to be told you are a fighter when, in fact, your body cannot be fought?

You're sport on, you can't "fight" cancer but I think it helps you, and those around you, if you can maintain a positive attitude to the situation you find yourself in. I think that's what people really mean when they refer to people with cancer