Yea Glebe Farm - Now that does bring back memories.
20 people all huddled around a small radio listening to the GAA action from across the water.
There were some real characters around back then who seemed to live for the Sunday gathering at Glebe Farm. I'd say my Father never missed a weekend out there. Great times.
18:41, Wed 5 Feb
DES
DES
BluenoseMo
Mom was born in Tipperary; came over when she was 17 to be a housekeeper to a doctor and his family who lived in Gerrards Cross but was later 'told' by her own mother she had to go up to Birmingham because her (mom's) sister needed someone to look after her baby whilst she went out to work. She met my dad, who was born in North Wales, whilst they both worked at Cadbury's. I was born in Harborne. I have always felt a very strong affinity towards Ireland and would love to move over there in the future.


Born in Harborne Mo? change your posting name to` posh Colleen` then!

Mo have you heard of that book finding Tipperary Mary?

KRO

Ha ha - we definitely weren't posh. 🤣🤣 Born in Lordswood Hospital, lived in a flat in Station Rd and moved to a council house in West Heath when I was 9 - many, many years ago.

Yes, have heard of the book - not read it though.
DES
19:23, Wed 5 Feb
I love Ireland, for a family holiday or a lads away weekend, but living there? No way, we tried it when we were kids! Dad and mom couldn’t wait to get back to Brum!
Kro
22:25, Wed 5 Feb
DES
Any Brummie Welsh out there.
22:35, Wed 5 Feb
Casper
That's my cousin. She was great. Our family is split pretty much half-way, when it comes to supporting 2nd city football teams. Sorry to say, despite growing up southside of the city, she doesn't support the Blues

I noticed you were getting your own tv exposure earlier today - well done Casper 👍
DES
11:44, Thu 6 Feb
BluenoseMo
Casper
That's my cousin. She was great. Our family is split pretty much half-way, when it comes to supporting 2nd city football teams. Sorry to say, despite growing up southside of the city, she doesn't support the Blues

I noticed you were getting your own tv exposure earlier today - well done Casper 👍
Have you ever noticed how many Irish in brum are from the west of Ireland?
Where did all the folks from Waterford, Wexford, Wicklow emigrate to?

Kro
15:02, Thu 6 Feb
I'm another Irish Brummie, with west coast immigrant families on both sides originally resettling around Sparkhill & Sparkbrook. Great memories growing up messing around with all the other Birmingham Irish kids in various South Brum catholic shebeens. Minesweeping our way around the big room at St Anne's on a Saturday night to the soundtrack of some incestuous Ceili band. Putting the vinyl knee-patches on my jeans to good use skidding around the Our Lady of Lourdes dancefloor to A Bunch of Thyme on a Sunday lunchtime. Seeing the Kingdom bag yet another All-Ireland in a packed St Dunstans's amidst a sea of empty Guinness glasses and Taytos wrappers. Witnessing your parish priest puking his ring in the jacks at the back of the function room in the Emerald Club to the muffled sound of Seamus Moore and his JCB band singing some song about having a big nob. Getting a bus to some little shop in Kings Heath because it sold soda bread, potato farls and Barry's Tea. Cycling down to a converted garden shed at St Brigid's on a Saturday evening in the rain to thumb through the back of the Irish Post & Irish World to see when the WolfeTones would next be on at the Irish Centre. Having a massive scrap with the minibus load of nutters up from Corby at the back of the main room at the Irish Centre as John Fitz introduced the Mighty band, only for it to be quelled by rushing waters of the annual flood of the toilets by the side entrance. Green tin-rattlers & An Phoblacht sellers. Drowsy Maggie upstairs at The Station in Selly Oak. Mick Sullivan & Symbolics at The Lamp. Sons of Erin at the Celtic Court, slightly tainted by Spencer the lead-singer being a DVB. Drinking in The Angel, The Brighton & The Marlborough before mustering the bravery to head up the Garry. The lively pubs of Digbeth & Deritend filled with music - the octogenarian accordion & cymbals double act at the Spotted Dog. The epic opening hours at Murphy's to accommodate the 2am shift change at Bradford St police station. Paddy Finn's 'alternate trade' (other than boxing and hostelry) booming in The Dubliner. Mistakenly shifting to McCafferey's or Kilkenny thinking that is was cool before inevitably returning to the black stuff. Drinking in 'Black Bush', the lovely barmaid at O'Neill's on Curzon St. Long after the Birmingham Irish scene began to slowly die (or at least my version of it did) I actually spent some years living in Ireland and whilst I had a great time I was strangely disappointed that it wasn't as good as I'd imagined - the late 70s to early 90s Irish Brummie experience was, to me, far better than the real thing.
15:48, Thu 6 Feb
DES
DES
BluenoseMo
Casper
That's my cousin. She was great. Our family is split pretty much half-way, when it comes to supporting 2nd city football teams. Sorry to say, despite growing up southside of the city, she doesn't support the Blues

I noticed you were getting your own tv exposure earlier today - well done Casper 👍
Have you ever noticed how many Irish in brum are from the west of Ireland?
Where did all the folks from Waterford, Wexford, Wicklow emigrate to?

Kro

Non West of ireland folk emmigrated to the same places as the Westerners.

It's just that the number of westerners emmirating were far greater as that part of the country
was affected more by the serious lack of oppurtunities there, compared to other parts.
' To hell or Connacht' as they say
Following on from the post re the Birmingham Irish programme last night. Got me wondering how many of us on SHA have a bit or a lot of Irish in our blood? If you have do you embrace your inner paddy or try to pretend you're all engerland?

Irish Dad, Welsh Mom.
Consider myself British, but currently ashamed of my country.
Says Britain on my current passport but it'll say Ireland on my next one.
Support all the British Isles national teams, but for the six nations it's Ireland just ahead of Wales, then Scotland a way behind (Scottish G-Grandmother), then the Ruperts way, way back, almost out of sight.
16:56, Thu 6 Feb
I'm another Irish Brummie, with west coast immigrant families on both sides originally resettling around Sparkhill & Sparkbrook. Great memories growing up messing around with all the other Birmingham Irish kids in various South Brum catholic shebeens. Minesweeping our way around the big room at St Anne's on a Saturday night to the soundtrack of some incestuous Ceili band. Putting the vinyl knee-patches on my jeans to good use skidding around the Our Lady of Lourdes dancefloor to A Bunch of Thyme on a Sunday lunchtime. Seeing the Kingdom bag yet another All-Ireland in a packed St Dunstans's amidst a sea of empty Guinness glasses and Taytos wrappers. Witnessing your parish priest puking his ring in the jacks at the back of the function room in the Emerald Club to the muffled sound of Seamus Moore and his JCB band singing some song about having a big nob. Getting a bus to some little shop in Kings Heath because it sold soda bread, potato farls and Barry's Tea. Cycling down to a converted garden shed at St Brigid's on a Saturday evening in the rain to thumb through the back of the Irish Post & Irish World to see when the WolfeTones would next be on at the Irish Centre. Having a massive scrap with the minibus load of nutters up from Corby at the back of the main room at the Irish Centre as John Fitz introduced the Mighty band, only for it to be quelled by rushing waters of the annual flood of the toilets by the side entrance. Green tin-rattlers & An Phoblacht sellers. Drowsy Maggie upstairs at The Station in Selly Oak. Mick Sullivan & Symbolics at The Lamp. Sons of Erin at the Celtic Court, slightly tainted by Spencer the lead-singer being a DVB. Drinking in The Angel, The Brighton & The Marlborough before mustering the bravery to head up the Garry. The lively pubs of Digbeth & Deritend filled with music - the octogenarian accordion & cymbals double act at the Spotted Dog. The epic opening hours at Murphy's to accommodate the 2am shift change at Bradford St police station. Paddy Finn's 'alternate trade' (other than boxing and hostelry) booming in The Dubliner. Mistakenly shifting to McCafferey's or Kilkenny thinking that is was cool before inevitably returning to the black stuff. Drinking in 'Black Bush', the lovely barmaid at O'Neill's on Curzon St. Long after the Birmingham Irish scene began to slowly die (or at least my version of it did) I actually spent some years living in Ireland and whilst I had a great time I was strangely disappointed that it wasn't as good as I'd imagined - the late 70s to early 90s Irish Brummie experience was, to me, far better than the real thing.


I haven’t lived in Brum for over 25 years. Is the culture still thriving? Where do people go now for drink and music?
DES
17:16, Thu 6 Feb
Great post yellow!
Sure loads on here will relate!
Strange experience being Irish brummie, I skipped most of those experiences but my younger Bro went through most of em!
Garryowen! Hat was the ultimate after hours experience!

Kro
YellowRivers
I'm another Irish Brummie, with west coast immigrant families on both sides originally resettling around Sparkhill & Sparkbrook. Great memories growing up messing around with all the other Birmingham Irish kids in various South Brum catholic shebeens. Minesweeping our way around the big room at St Anne's on a Saturday night to the soundtrack of some incestuous Ceili band. Putting the vinyl knee-patches on my jeans to good use skidding around the Our Lady of Lourdes dancefloor to A Bunch of Thyme on a Sunday lunchtime. Seeing the Kingdom bag yet another All-Ireland in a packed St Dunstans's amidst a sea of empty Guinness glasses and Taytos wrappers. Witnessing your parish priest puking his ring in the jacks at the back of the function room in the Emerald Club to the muffled sound of Seamus Moore and his JCB band singing some song about having a big nob. Getting a bus to some little shop in Kings Heath because it sold soda bread, potato farls and Barry's Tea. Cycling down to a converted garden shed at St Brigid's on a Saturday evening in the rain to thumb through the back of the Irish Post & Irish World to see when the WolfeTones would next be on at the Irish Centre. Having a massive scrap with the minibus load of nutters up from Corby at the back of the main room at the Irish Centre as John Fitz introduced the Mighty band, only for it to be quelled by rushing waters of the annual flood of the toilets by the side entrance. Green tin-rattlers & An Phoblacht sellers. Drowsy Maggie upstairs at The Station in Selly Oak. Mick Sullivan & Symbolics at The Lamp. Sons of Erin at the Celtic Court, slightly tainted by Spencer the lead-singer being a DVB. Drinking in The Angel, The Brighton & The Marlborough before mustering the bravery to head up the Garry. The lively pubs of Digbeth & Deritend filled with music - the octogenarian accordion & cymbals double act at the Spotted Dog. The epic opening hours at Murphy's to accommodate the 2am shift change at Bradford St police station. Paddy Finn's 'alternate trade' (other than boxing and hostelry) booming in The Dubliner. Mistakenly shifting to McCafferey's or Kilkenny thinking that is was cool before inevitably returning to the black stuff. Drinking in 'Black Bush', the lovely barmaid at O'Neill's on Curzon St. Long after the Birmingham Irish scene began to slowly die (or at least my version of it did) I actually spent some years living in Ireland and whilst I had a great time I was strangely disappointed that it wasn't as good as I'd imagined - the late 70s to early 90s Irish Brummie experience was, to me, far better than the real thing.


I haven’t lived in Brum for over 25 years. Is the culture still thriving? Where do people go now for drink and music?


There is a lot of what I did in the large post you did..Do I know you :):)

Culture still around but sadly dying out imo. Certainly, nothing like it was
EG.. All the pubs on stratford rd sparkbrook and sparkhill are gone ( as with many pubs in many areas tbf)
Irish centre closed and moved to Kings Heath. Lady of lourdes still going
White swan gone but the Dog still there.
Plenty going on in Digbeth but not necessarily irish themed thesedays, other bars, clubs etc

All the Irish have now moved out from places like Sparkhill to the likes of Hall Green, shirley, solihull
and of course many of the old irish born folk have passed on, not many left. I've also noticed
that the 3rd gen are not interested in going to 'traditional' old irish pubs like we did at their age eg White swan
and are more interested in the bright lights of town
Shame to hear things have changed so much but understandable with the dilution of a generation. Those kind of pubs are sadly dwindling countrywide irrespective of whether they have Irish customers or not. I’ve come across some places elsewhere in Britain (Liverpool, London) with a similar vibe but they all lack the magic ingredient of Brummie bathos. Sounds like we were in the same places around the same time. As with many conversations like this in many a pub over the years, before we’d finish talking shoite together we’d probably conclude that not only do we know each other but that we are second cousins, twice removed. Btw Deritend not Digbeth too.
You’d be surprised, mate. My son is 3G and is rarely away from Digbeth. Just asked him if many of his kind go there- ‘hundreds’ was his reply, the White Swan has gone, as has the Irish Centre (although that hadn’t been a popular haunt with young Irish for a good few years).

But there are new pubs aimed at them- eg Norton’s, just down from Hennesseys, which will be having plenty of Irish music acts on (not least Sharon Shannon, around St Patricks day).

Edit- loved that post Yellow River👍
Cowinbovril
DES
21:24, Thu 6 Feb
I suppose henneseys is proper 3G Irish really by changing standards, Gary always flies the tricolour!
Although he is a baggie it’s still a no go area for vilers!

Kro